top of page
Search
  • Writer's picturegoodtimesspinning

What is a temporary structure?



Here at Your Crew we have the opportunity to create some of the most spectacular structures, from wedding marquees, festival stages, arenas to temporary film studios, warehousing and even Christmas grottos complete with ice rinks! Read what Katherine Jones has to say...


Temporary structures can mean different things to different people. The range of definitions can stretch from a small tent on a campsite to a large exposition visited by thousands, and the same difficulties apply when thinking about temporary buildings and industrial marquees.

When thinking about a marquee it is natural to imagine a huge tent, possibly erected for a special occasion like a wedding, but an industrial marquee can just as easily be a solid structure with walls and a roof which is altogether longer lasting. How these two quite separate structures which differ both in materials used and method of construction can be confused with each other is not entirely known but we can have a guess.

The ebb and flow of economic activity, or an unfortunate event like a fire, has always meant that businesses may need more space for storage or processing and a temporary building to meet this need is a logical solution. Once the only alternative to a brick and mortar edifice would have been a large marquee-style structure made from canvas and supported by poles and guy ropes. These structures became known as industrial marquees and they provided basic weather protection for materials and people. The terminology has carried on even though temporary buildings are now a very different animal from the industrial marquees used in the past.

So it is possible that, because the first temporarily buildings were marquees, the name has continued to be used for other types of buildings. It may not be such a misnomer however as modern temporary buildings can be as easy to erect as a large marquee. Typically existing hard standing is used and buildings are anchored into the ground using base plates which the frame is subsequently affixed and then lifted into place. It's the lack of any ground preparation or foundations that bear the similarity to a marquee though. So how can temporary buildings be built in this way?

The answer to this lies in the lightweight modular frame which doesn't need the same kind of weight distribution as its heavier cousin, steel. Although lightweight the aluminium frame does meet the required British Standards for structural safety, meaning it can withstand the UK's maximum snow and wind loadings and can be used instead of a permanent building. Aluminium as a material also can flex against impact which provides significant added strength. Then there is the matter of corrosion; aluminium will not rust like steel. So although lightweight the aluminium frame provides ample strength and longevity alongside fast easy handling, transportation and installation. It's just unfortunate that the benefits derived from the frame can in some cases lead to a wrong perception of quality.

Often marquees are hired as they are often used for special events and indeed when thinking of marquees hiring them is the first thing that comes to mind. Interestingly, hiring is also a significant advantage of temporary buildings as they can be built and dismantled quickly. This short-term or interim usage opens up a wealth of opportunities for businesses, particularly in the fragile economy. Space can be created at the drop of a hat to accommodate growth and removed again if the growth declines or the contract comes to an end. Unlike marquees, you can hire for as long as needed, from 1 one onwards. Marquees cannot be left in place for long periods as they are not engineered to meet the same snow and wind loadings as a temporary building. This means the frame profiles are smaller and not as thick or strong. Temporary buildings however can be used indefinitely and often are as an alternative to a more permanent structure. For this reason, suppliers offer purchase options alongside the hire contracts and for long-term requirements, it's often more cost-effective to buy the building outright than hire for a long time.

So whatever it is called extra space to capitalise on opportunities presented by business growth or to overcome an unfortunate disaster is available, and does not have to cost a fortune.

Temporary structures can mean different things to different people. The range of definitions can stretch from a small tent on a campsite to a large exposition visited by thousands, and the same difficulties apply when thinking about temporary buildings and industrial marquees.

When thinking about a marquee it is natural to imagine a huge tent, possibly erected for a special occasion like a wedding, but an industrial marquee can just as easily be a solid structure with walls and a roof which is altogether longer lasting. How these two quite separate structures which differ both in materials used and method of construction can be confused with each other is not entirely known but we can have a guess.

The ebb and flow of economic activity, or an unfortunate event like a fire, has always meant that businesses may need more space for storage or processing and a temporary building to meet this need is a logical solution. Once the only alternative to a brick and mortar edifice would have been a large marquee-style structure made from canvas and supported by poles and guy ropes. These structures became known as industrial marquees and they provided basic weather protection for materials and people. The terminology has carried on even though temporary buildings are now a very different animal from the industrial marquees used in the past.

So it is possible that, because the first temporarily buildings were marquees, the name has continued to be used for other types of buildings. It may not be such a misnomer however as modern temporary buildings can be as easy to erect as a large marquee. Typically existing hard standing is used and buildings are anchored into the ground using base plates which the frame is subsequently affixed and then lifted into place. It's the lack of any ground preparation or foundations that bear the similarity to a marquee though. So how can temporary buildings be built in this way?

The answer to this lies in the lightweight modular frame which doesn't need the same kind of weight distribution as its heavier cousin, steel. Although lightweight the aluminium frame does meet the required British Standards for structural safety, meaning it can withstand the UK's maximum snow and wind loadings and can be used instead of a permanent building. Aluminium as a material also can flex against impact which provides significant added strength. Then there is the matter of corrosion; aluminium will not rust like steel. So although lightweight the aluminium frame provides ample strength and longevity alongside fast easy handling, transportation and installation. It's just unfortunate that the benefits derived from the frame can in some cases lead to a wrong perception of quality.

Often marquees are hired as they are often used for special events and indeed when thinking of marquees hiring them is the first thing that comes to mind. Interestingly, hiring is also a significant advantage of temporary buildings as they can be built and dismantled quickly. This short-term or interim usage opens up a wealth of opportunities for businesses, particularly in the fragile economy. Space can be created at the drop of a hat to accommodate growth and removed again if the growth declines or the contract comes to an end. Unlike marquees, you can hire for as long as needed, from 1 one onwards. Marquees cannot be left in place for long periods as they are not engineered to meet the same snow and wind loadings as a temporary building. This means the frame profiles are smaller and not as thick or strong. Temporary buildings however can be used indefinitely and often are as an alternative to a more permanent structure. For this reason, suppliers offer purchase options alongside the hire contracts and for long-term requirements, it's often more cost-effective to buy the building outright than hire for a long time.

So whatever it is called extra space to capitalise on opportunities presented by business growth or to overcome an unfortunate disaster is available, and does not have to cost a fortune.Temporary structures can mean different things to different people. The range of definitions can stretch from a small tent on a campsite to a large exposition visited by thousands, and the same difficulties apply when thinking about temporary buildings and industrial marquees.

When thinking about a marquee it is natural to imagine a huge tent, possibly erected for a special occasion like a wedding, but an industrial marquee can just as easily be a solid structure with walls and a roof which is altogether longer lasting. How these two quite separate structures which differ both in materials used and method of construction can be confused with each other is not entirely known but we can have a guess.

The ebb and flow of economic activity, or an unfortunate event like a fire, has always meant that businesses may need more space for storage or processing and a temporary building to meet this need is a logical solution. Once the only alternative to a brick and mortar edifice would have been a large marquee-style structure made from canvas and supported by poles and guy ropes. These structures became known as industrial marquees and they provided basic weather protection for materials and people. The terminology has carried on even though temporary buildings are now a very different animal from the industrial marquees used in the past.

So it is possible that, because the first temporarily buildings were marquees, the name has continued to be used for other types of buildings. It may not be such a misnomer however as modern temporary buildings can be as easy to erect as a large marquee. Typically existing hard standing is used and buildings are anchored into the ground using base plates which the frame is subsequently affixed and then lifted into place. It's the lack of any ground preparation or foundations that bear the similarity to a marquee though. So how can temporary buildings be built in this way?

The answer to this lies in the lightweight modular frame which doesn't need the same kind of weight distribution as its heavier cousin, steel. Although lightweight the aluminium frame does meet the required British Standards for structural safety, meaning it can withstand the UK's maximum snow and wind loadings and can be used instead of a permanent building. Aluminium as a material also can flex against impact which provides significant added strength. Then there is the matter of corrosion; aluminium will not rust like steel. So although lightweight the aluminium frame provides ample strength and longevity alongside fast easy handling, transportation and installation. It's just unfortunate that the benefits derived from the frame can in some cases lead to a wrong perception of quality.

Often marquees are hired as they are often used for special events and indeed when thinking of marquees hiring them is the first thing that comes to mind. Interestingly, hiring is also a significant advantage of temporary buildings as they can be built and dismantled quickly. This short-term or interim usage opens up a wealth of opportunities for businesses, particularly in the fragile economy. Space can be created at the drop of a hat to accommodate growth and removed again if the growth declines or the contract comes to an end. Unlike marquees, you can hire for as long as needed, from 1 one onwards. Marquees cannot be left in place for long periods as they are not engineered to meet the same snow and wind loadings as a temporary building. This means the frame profiles are smaller and not as thick or strong. Temporary buildings however can be used indefinitely and often are as an alternative to a more permanent structure. For this reason, suppliers offer purchase options alongside the hire contracts and for long-term requirements, it's often more cost-effective to buy the building outright than hire for a long time.

So whatever it is called extra space to capitalise on opportunities presented by business growth or to overcome an unfortunate disaster is available, and does not have to cost a fortune.


So if you want to see what structures are on the way up or indeed on the way down then check on our News page to see what's on go!


8 views0 comments

Commentaires


Post: Blog2_Post
bottom of page